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Culver’s touts quality in new ads

Culver’s touts quality in new ads


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Culver’s will debut new television commercials Monday to advertise its longtime Flavor of the Day frozen custard program for the first time.

The commercial, starring brand founder and chief executive Craig Culver and Ted Galloway of Classic Mix Partners LLC, the chain’s frozen custard supplier, is an extension of Culver’s “Welcome to Delicious” branding campaign. Previous spots have shown Culver discussing the sourcing of the brand’s beef, dairy and fish with suppliers.

Culver and Galloway draw comparisons in the commercial between Culver’s frozen custard and regular ice cream.

“People are amazed at how rich and luscious fresh frozen custard is compared to ice cream,” Culver said in a statement. “When people think of Culver’s, they think of Flavor of the Day. We’ve offered it from the start.”

At each Culver’s restaurant, a Flavor of the Day is offered from the 80 different flavors the brand rotates in.

Other restaurant chains have recently run commercials featuring their suppliers, including McDonald’s and Domino’s Pizza, as well as Chipotle Mexican Grill with its “Food with Integrity” campaign. To help the “Welcome to Delicious” spots for custard stand out, Culver’s will supplement the campaign with radio, print, in-store and social-media advertising.

The chain also will run its Dessert’d Island Sweepstakes through June 29. Customers will receive a ticket containing a unique promotion code with every purchase of a Flavor of the Day frozen custard item. They can enter that code at Culver’s Facebook page to enter the sweepstakes for a chance to win a seven-night vacation for four to Captiva Island, Fla.

“[The contest] is a continuation of our social-media outreach,” vice president of marketing David Stidham said in an email to Nation’s Restaurant News. “We will be using social media and digital to not only create awareness of our Flavor of the Day but also to always drive traffic to our restaurants.”

Culver’s never has advertised the Flavor of the Day program on broadcast platforms until now, Stidham said, though the chain’s iPhone and Android mobile apps let consumers get a five-day flavor forecast for their local Culver’s, as well as set alerts for when favorite flavors become available.

The mobile app has been downloaded more than 132,000 times to date, Stidham said.

Prairie du Sac, Wis.-based Culver’s operates three restaurants and franchises another 447 locations in 19 states. Culver founded the chain with his wife and parents in 1984.

Contact Mark Brandau at [email protected]
Follow him on Twitter: @Mark_from_NRN


Firestone Walker Touts Beer with &lsquoPublic Domain&rsquo Hops - Here's Why You Should Care

Some of the trendiest hops varieties out there are actually patented.

Not all hops are created equal. Some are more tropical, others more piney, some earthy, floral and so on. From a more technical standpoint, some hops are more potent than others, containing differing levels of alpha acids, the chemical compound that contributes to bitterness. Hops have different countries of origin, and whereas some have long histories, others have been developed extremely recently through breeding – which leads to one more often overlooked difference in hops: Some are free to be grown by anyone and others are actually patented by the company that developed the plant.

For its most recent beer in its ongoing Luponic Distortion series, California’ Firestone Walker Brewing Company decided to put the discussion over these two types of hops – often called “public” and �signer” hops – in the forefront. Luponic Distortion uses a revolving group of hops for every release, and with Revolution No. 009, the brewery is proudly touting that it has used six “public domain” hop varieties.

Designer hops have become especially popular in recent years with names like Mosaic, Citra and Simcoe landing a spot on the label. It’s not surprising that breweries would want to show off these patented varieties: Yes, they can impart some amazing flavors, but they can also be more difficult to come by and more expensive to secure.

But as Firestone Walker Brewmaster Matt Brynildson explains, public hop varieties still have their place in the beer world. “I am passionate about public domain hops that may not have the cachet of their privatized brethren, but that are cooler than some might think,” he said. “Revolution No. 009 is all about showcasing these unsung varieties.”

Brynildson also points out at that not all public hops are classics like Hallertau and Fuggle. 𠇊 lot of people tend to think of American public domain hops as ‘old school’ stuff, but we’ve fallen in love with some newer ones and thought it would be fun to bring them to the forefront with Revolution No. 009,” he continued. “I think people might be surprised at how fresh and interesting these hops can be.”

Ironically enough, in the announcement for Luponic Distortion Revolution No. 009 – which is out now – Firestone Walker doesn’t explicitly announce which hops were used, only stating that the beer contains two from the Pacific Northwest and Germany. But hey, you don’t want to make everything in your life public, do you?


Firestone Walker Touts Beer with &lsquoPublic Domain&rsquo Hops - Here's Why You Should Care

Some of the trendiest hops varieties out there are actually patented.

Not all hops are created equal. Some are more tropical, others more piney, some earthy, floral and so on. From a more technical standpoint, some hops are more potent than others, containing differing levels of alpha acids, the chemical compound that contributes to bitterness. Hops have different countries of origin, and whereas some have long histories, others have been developed extremely recently through breeding – which leads to one more often overlooked difference in hops: Some are free to be grown by anyone and others are actually patented by the company that developed the plant.

For its most recent beer in its ongoing Luponic Distortion series, California’ Firestone Walker Brewing Company decided to put the discussion over these two types of hops – often called “public” and �signer” hops – in the forefront. Luponic Distortion uses a revolving group of hops for every release, and with Revolution No. 009, the brewery is proudly touting that it has used six “public domain” hop varieties.

Designer hops have become especially popular in recent years with names like Mosaic, Citra and Simcoe landing a spot on the label. It’s not surprising that breweries would want to show off these patented varieties: Yes, they can impart some amazing flavors, but they can also be more difficult to come by and more expensive to secure.

But as Firestone Walker Brewmaster Matt Brynildson explains, public hop varieties still have their place in the beer world. “I am passionate about public domain hops that may not have the cachet of their privatized brethren, but that are cooler than some might think,” he said. “Revolution No. 009 is all about showcasing these unsung varieties.”

Brynildson also points out at that not all public hops are classics like Hallertau and Fuggle. 𠇊 lot of people tend to think of American public domain hops as ‘old school’ stuff, but we’ve fallen in love with some newer ones and thought it would be fun to bring them to the forefront with Revolution No. 009,” he continued. “I think people might be surprised at how fresh and interesting these hops can be.”

Ironically enough, in the announcement for Luponic Distortion Revolution No. 009 – which is out now – Firestone Walker doesn’t explicitly announce which hops were used, only stating that the beer contains two from the Pacific Northwest and Germany. But hey, you don’t want to make everything in your life public, do you?


Firestone Walker Touts Beer with &lsquoPublic Domain&rsquo Hops - Here's Why You Should Care

Some of the trendiest hops varieties out there are actually patented.

Not all hops are created equal. Some are more tropical, others more piney, some earthy, floral and so on. From a more technical standpoint, some hops are more potent than others, containing differing levels of alpha acids, the chemical compound that contributes to bitterness. Hops have different countries of origin, and whereas some have long histories, others have been developed extremely recently through breeding – which leads to one more often overlooked difference in hops: Some are free to be grown by anyone and others are actually patented by the company that developed the plant.

For its most recent beer in its ongoing Luponic Distortion series, California’ Firestone Walker Brewing Company decided to put the discussion over these two types of hops – often called “public” and �signer” hops – in the forefront. Luponic Distortion uses a revolving group of hops for every release, and with Revolution No. 009, the brewery is proudly touting that it has used six “public domain” hop varieties.

Designer hops have become especially popular in recent years with names like Mosaic, Citra and Simcoe landing a spot on the label. It’s not surprising that breweries would want to show off these patented varieties: Yes, they can impart some amazing flavors, but they can also be more difficult to come by and more expensive to secure.

But as Firestone Walker Brewmaster Matt Brynildson explains, public hop varieties still have their place in the beer world. “I am passionate about public domain hops that may not have the cachet of their privatized brethren, but that are cooler than some might think,” he said. “Revolution No. 009 is all about showcasing these unsung varieties.”

Brynildson also points out at that not all public hops are classics like Hallertau and Fuggle. 𠇊 lot of people tend to think of American public domain hops as ‘old school’ stuff, but we’ve fallen in love with some newer ones and thought it would be fun to bring them to the forefront with Revolution No. 009,” he continued. “I think people might be surprised at how fresh and interesting these hops can be.”

Ironically enough, in the announcement for Luponic Distortion Revolution No. 009 – which is out now – Firestone Walker doesn’t explicitly announce which hops were used, only stating that the beer contains two from the Pacific Northwest and Germany. But hey, you don’t want to make everything in your life public, do you?


Firestone Walker Touts Beer with &lsquoPublic Domain&rsquo Hops - Here's Why You Should Care

Some of the trendiest hops varieties out there are actually patented.

Not all hops are created equal. Some are more tropical, others more piney, some earthy, floral and so on. From a more technical standpoint, some hops are more potent than others, containing differing levels of alpha acids, the chemical compound that contributes to bitterness. Hops have different countries of origin, and whereas some have long histories, others have been developed extremely recently through breeding – which leads to one more often overlooked difference in hops: Some are free to be grown by anyone and others are actually patented by the company that developed the plant.

For its most recent beer in its ongoing Luponic Distortion series, California’ Firestone Walker Brewing Company decided to put the discussion over these two types of hops – often called “public” and �signer” hops – in the forefront. Luponic Distortion uses a revolving group of hops for every release, and with Revolution No. 009, the brewery is proudly touting that it has used six “public domain” hop varieties.

Designer hops have become especially popular in recent years with names like Mosaic, Citra and Simcoe landing a spot on the label. It’s not surprising that breweries would want to show off these patented varieties: Yes, they can impart some amazing flavors, but they can also be more difficult to come by and more expensive to secure.

But as Firestone Walker Brewmaster Matt Brynildson explains, public hop varieties still have their place in the beer world. “I am passionate about public domain hops that may not have the cachet of their privatized brethren, but that are cooler than some might think,” he said. “Revolution No. 009 is all about showcasing these unsung varieties.”

Brynildson also points out at that not all public hops are classics like Hallertau and Fuggle. 𠇊 lot of people tend to think of American public domain hops as ‘old school’ stuff, but we’ve fallen in love with some newer ones and thought it would be fun to bring them to the forefront with Revolution No. 009,” he continued. “I think people might be surprised at how fresh and interesting these hops can be.”

Ironically enough, in the announcement for Luponic Distortion Revolution No. 009 – which is out now – Firestone Walker doesn’t explicitly announce which hops were used, only stating that the beer contains two from the Pacific Northwest and Germany. But hey, you don’t want to make everything in your life public, do you?


Firestone Walker Touts Beer with &lsquoPublic Domain&rsquo Hops - Here's Why You Should Care

Some of the trendiest hops varieties out there are actually patented.

Not all hops are created equal. Some are more tropical, others more piney, some earthy, floral and so on. From a more technical standpoint, some hops are more potent than others, containing differing levels of alpha acids, the chemical compound that contributes to bitterness. Hops have different countries of origin, and whereas some have long histories, others have been developed extremely recently through breeding – which leads to one more often overlooked difference in hops: Some are free to be grown by anyone and others are actually patented by the company that developed the plant.

For its most recent beer in its ongoing Luponic Distortion series, California’ Firestone Walker Brewing Company decided to put the discussion over these two types of hops – often called “public” and �signer” hops – in the forefront. Luponic Distortion uses a revolving group of hops for every release, and with Revolution No. 009, the brewery is proudly touting that it has used six “public domain” hop varieties.

Designer hops have become especially popular in recent years with names like Mosaic, Citra and Simcoe landing a spot on the label. It’s not surprising that breweries would want to show off these patented varieties: Yes, they can impart some amazing flavors, but they can also be more difficult to come by and more expensive to secure.

But as Firestone Walker Brewmaster Matt Brynildson explains, public hop varieties still have their place in the beer world. “I am passionate about public domain hops that may not have the cachet of their privatized brethren, but that are cooler than some might think,” he said. “Revolution No. 009 is all about showcasing these unsung varieties.”

Brynildson also points out at that not all public hops are classics like Hallertau and Fuggle. 𠇊 lot of people tend to think of American public domain hops as ‘old school’ stuff, but we’ve fallen in love with some newer ones and thought it would be fun to bring them to the forefront with Revolution No. 009,” he continued. “I think people might be surprised at how fresh and interesting these hops can be.”

Ironically enough, in the announcement for Luponic Distortion Revolution No. 009 – which is out now – Firestone Walker doesn’t explicitly announce which hops were used, only stating that the beer contains two from the Pacific Northwest and Germany. But hey, you don’t want to make everything in your life public, do you?


Firestone Walker Touts Beer with &lsquoPublic Domain&rsquo Hops - Here's Why You Should Care

Some of the trendiest hops varieties out there are actually patented.

Not all hops are created equal. Some are more tropical, others more piney, some earthy, floral and so on. From a more technical standpoint, some hops are more potent than others, containing differing levels of alpha acids, the chemical compound that contributes to bitterness. Hops have different countries of origin, and whereas some have long histories, others have been developed extremely recently through breeding – which leads to one more often overlooked difference in hops: Some are free to be grown by anyone and others are actually patented by the company that developed the plant.

For its most recent beer in its ongoing Luponic Distortion series, California’ Firestone Walker Brewing Company decided to put the discussion over these two types of hops – often called “public” and �signer” hops – in the forefront. Luponic Distortion uses a revolving group of hops for every release, and with Revolution No. 009, the brewery is proudly touting that it has used six “public domain” hop varieties.

Designer hops have become especially popular in recent years with names like Mosaic, Citra and Simcoe landing a spot on the label. It’s not surprising that breweries would want to show off these patented varieties: Yes, they can impart some amazing flavors, but they can also be more difficult to come by and more expensive to secure.

But as Firestone Walker Brewmaster Matt Brynildson explains, public hop varieties still have their place in the beer world. “I am passionate about public domain hops that may not have the cachet of their privatized brethren, but that are cooler than some might think,” he said. “Revolution No. 009 is all about showcasing these unsung varieties.”

Brynildson also points out at that not all public hops are classics like Hallertau and Fuggle. 𠇊 lot of people tend to think of American public domain hops as ‘old school’ stuff, but we’ve fallen in love with some newer ones and thought it would be fun to bring them to the forefront with Revolution No. 009,” he continued. “I think people might be surprised at how fresh and interesting these hops can be.”

Ironically enough, in the announcement for Luponic Distortion Revolution No. 009 – which is out now – Firestone Walker doesn’t explicitly announce which hops were used, only stating that the beer contains two from the Pacific Northwest and Germany. But hey, you don’t want to make everything in your life public, do you?


Firestone Walker Touts Beer with &lsquoPublic Domain&rsquo Hops - Here's Why You Should Care

Some of the trendiest hops varieties out there are actually patented.

Not all hops are created equal. Some are more tropical, others more piney, some earthy, floral and so on. From a more technical standpoint, some hops are more potent than others, containing differing levels of alpha acids, the chemical compound that contributes to bitterness. Hops have different countries of origin, and whereas some have long histories, others have been developed extremely recently through breeding – which leads to one more often overlooked difference in hops: Some are free to be grown by anyone and others are actually patented by the company that developed the plant.

For its most recent beer in its ongoing Luponic Distortion series, California’ Firestone Walker Brewing Company decided to put the discussion over these two types of hops – often called “public” and �signer” hops – in the forefront. Luponic Distortion uses a revolving group of hops for every release, and with Revolution No. 009, the brewery is proudly touting that it has used six “public domain” hop varieties.

Designer hops have become especially popular in recent years with names like Mosaic, Citra and Simcoe landing a spot on the label. It’s not surprising that breweries would want to show off these patented varieties: Yes, they can impart some amazing flavors, but they can also be more difficult to come by and more expensive to secure.

But as Firestone Walker Brewmaster Matt Brynildson explains, public hop varieties still have their place in the beer world. “I am passionate about public domain hops that may not have the cachet of their privatized brethren, but that are cooler than some might think,” he said. “Revolution No. 009 is all about showcasing these unsung varieties.”

Brynildson also points out at that not all public hops are classics like Hallertau and Fuggle. 𠇊 lot of people tend to think of American public domain hops as ‘old school’ stuff, but we’ve fallen in love with some newer ones and thought it would be fun to bring them to the forefront with Revolution No. 009,” he continued. “I think people might be surprised at how fresh and interesting these hops can be.”

Ironically enough, in the announcement for Luponic Distortion Revolution No. 009 – which is out now – Firestone Walker doesn’t explicitly announce which hops were used, only stating that the beer contains two from the Pacific Northwest and Germany. But hey, you don’t want to make everything in your life public, do you?


Firestone Walker Touts Beer with &lsquoPublic Domain&rsquo Hops - Here's Why You Should Care

Some of the trendiest hops varieties out there are actually patented.

Not all hops are created equal. Some are more tropical, others more piney, some earthy, floral and so on. From a more technical standpoint, some hops are more potent than others, containing differing levels of alpha acids, the chemical compound that contributes to bitterness. Hops have different countries of origin, and whereas some have long histories, others have been developed extremely recently through breeding – which leads to one more often overlooked difference in hops: Some are free to be grown by anyone and others are actually patented by the company that developed the plant.

For its most recent beer in its ongoing Luponic Distortion series, California’ Firestone Walker Brewing Company decided to put the discussion over these two types of hops – often called “public” and �signer” hops – in the forefront. Luponic Distortion uses a revolving group of hops for every release, and with Revolution No. 009, the brewery is proudly touting that it has used six “public domain” hop varieties.

Designer hops have become especially popular in recent years with names like Mosaic, Citra and Simcoe landing a spot on the label. It’s not surprising that breweries would want to show off these patented varieties: Yes, they can impart some amazing flavors, but they can also be more difficult to come by and more expensive to secure.

But as Firestone Walker Brewmaster Matt Brynildson explains, public hop varieties still have their place in the beer world. “I am passionate about public domain hops that may not have the cachet of their privatized brethren, but that are cooler than some might think,” he said. “Revolution No. 009 is all about showcasing these unsung varieties.”

Brynildson also points out at that not all public hops are classics like Hallertau and Fuggle. 𠇊 lot of people tend to think of American public domain hops as ‘old school’ stuff, but we’ve fallen in love with some newer ones and thought it would be fun to bring them to the forefront with Revolution No. 009,” he continued. “I think people might be surprised at how fresh and interesting these hops can be.”

Ironically enough, in the announcement for Luponic Distortion Revolution No. 009 – which is out now – Firestone Walker doesn’t explicitly announce which hops were used, only stating that the beer contains two from the Pacific Northwest and Germany. But hey, you don’t want to make everything in your life public, do you?


Firestone Walker Touts Beer with &lsquoPublic Domain&rsquo Hops - Here's Why You Should Care

Some of the trendiest hops varieties out there are actually patented.

Not all hops are created equal. Some are more tropical, others more piney, some earthy, floral and so on. From a more technical standpoint, some hops are more potent than others, containing differing levels of alpha acids, the chemical compound that contributes to bitterness. Hops have different countries of origin, and whereas some have long histories, others have been developed extremely recently through breeding – which leads to one more often overlooked difference in hops: Some are free to be grown by anyone and others are actually patented by the company that developed the plant.

For its most recent beer in its ongoing Luponic Distortion series, California’ Firestone Walker Brewing Company decided to put the discussion over these two types of hops – often called “public” and �signer” hops – in the forefront. Luponic Distortion uses a revolving group of hops for every release, and with Revolution No. 009, the brewery is proudly touting that it has used six “public domain” hop varieties.

Designer hops have become especially popular in recent years with names like Mosaic, Citra and Simcoe landing a spot on the label. It’s not surprising that breweries would want to show off these patented varieties: Yes, they can impart some amazing flavors, but they can also be more difficult to come by and more expensive to secure.

But as Firestone Walker Brewmaster Matt Brynildson explains, public hop varieties still have their place in the beer world. “I am passionate about public domain hops that may not have the cachet of their privatized brethren, but that are cooler than some might think,” he said. “Revolution No. 009 is all about showcasing these unsung varieties.”

Brynildson also points out at that not all public hops are classics like Hallertau and Fuggle. 𠇊 lot of people tend to think of American public domain hops as ‘old school’ stuff, but we’ve fallen in love with some newer ones and thought it would be fun to bring them to the forefront with Revolution No. 009,” he continued. “I think people might be surprised at how fresh and interesting these hops can be.”

Ironically enough, in the announcement for Luponic Distortion Revolution No. 009 – which is out now – Firestone Walker doesn’t explicitly announce which hops were used, only stating that the beer contains two from the Pacific Northwest and Germany. But hey, you don’t want to make everything in your life public, do you?


Firestone Walker Touts Beer with &lsquoPublic Domain&rsquo Hops - Here's Why You Should Care

Some of the trendiest hops varieties out there are actually patented.

Not all hops are created equal. Some are more tropical, others more piney, some earthy, floral and so on. From a more technical standpoint, some hops are more potent than others, containing differing levels of alpha acids, the chemical compound that contributes to bitterness. Hops have different countries of origin, and whereas some have long histories, others have been developed extremely recently through breeding – which leads to one more often overlooked difference in hops: Some are free to be grown by anyone and others are actually patented by the company that developed the plant.

For its most recent beer in its ongoing Luponic Distortion series, California’ Firestone Walker Brewing Company decided to put the discussion over these two types of hops – often called “public” and �signer” hops – in the forefront. Luponic Distortion uses a revolving group of hops for every release, and with Revolution No. 009, the brewery is proudly touting that it has used six “public domain” hop varieties.

Designer hops have become especially popular in recent years with names like Mosaic, Citra and Simcoe landing a spot on the label. It’s not surprising that breweries would want to show off these patented varieties: Yes, they can impart some amazing flavors, but they can also be more difficult to come by and more expensive to secure.

But as Firestone Walker Brewmaster Matt Brynildson explains, public hop varieties still have their place in the beer world. “I am passionate about public domain hops that may not have the cachet of their privatized brethren, but that are cooler than some might think,” he said. “Revolution No. 009 is all about showcasing these unsung varieties.”

Brynildson also points out at that not all public hops are classics like Hallertau and Fuggle. 𠇊 lot of people tend to think of American public domain hops as ‘old school’ stuff, but we’ve fallen in love with some newer ones and thought it would be fun to bring them to the forefront with Revolution No. 009,” he continued. “I think people might be surprised at how fresh and interesting these hops can be.”

Ironically enough, in the announcement for Luponic Distortion Revolution No. 009 – which is out now – Firestone Walker doesn’t explicitly announce which hops were used, only stating that the beer contains two from the Pacific Northwest and Germany. But hey, you don’t want to make everything in your life public, do you?


Watch the video: ΔΙΑΦΗΜΙΣΕΙΣ ΠΟΥ ΑΦΗΣΑΝ ΕΠΟΧΗ (June 2022).


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